FDA draft guidance – Continuous Manufacturing

The FDA published today a new draft guidance “Quality Considerations for Continuous Manufacturing Guidance for Industry.” Which, together with ICH plans continues to demonstrate the emphasis on continuous manufacturing.

More a set of questions than anything else, this is a good document for those who are grappling with the challenges of continuous manufacturing.

FDA launching pilot program on established conditions

The FDA has announced a pilot program to “propose explicit established conditions (ECs) as part of an original new drug application (NDA),
abbreviated new drug application (ANDA), biologics license application
(BLA), or as a prior approval supplement (PAS) to any of these.”

As the FDA mentioned, this is a followup of two draft guidances: The 2015 FDA ‘‘Established Conditions: Reportable CMC Changes for Approved Drug and Biologic Products’’and the draft Q12.

It is exciting to see Q12 move forward. We can argue about its imperfections, but at the end of the day this is a big step for the industry.

The role of a data steward

With data integrity on everyone’s mind the last few years, the role of a data steward is being more and more discussed. Putting aside my amusement on the proliferation of stewards and champions across our quality systems, the idea of data stewards is a good one.

Data steward is someone from the business who handle master data. It is not an IT role, as a good data steward will truly be invested in how the data is being used, managed and groomed. The data steward is responsible and accountable for how data enters the system and ensure it adds value to the process.

The job revolves around, but is not limited to, the following questions:

  • Why is this particular data important to the organization?
  • How long should the particular records (data) be stored or kept?
  • Measurements to improve the quality of that analysis

Data stewards do this by providing:

  • Operational Oversight by overseeing the life cycle through defining and implementing policies and procedures for the day-to-day operational and administrative management of systems and data — including the intake, storage, processing, and transmission of data to internal and external systems. They are accountable to define and document data and terminology in a relevant glossary. This includes ensuring that each critical data element has a clear definition and is still in use.
  • Data quality, including evaluation and root cause analysis
  • Risk management, including retention, archival, and disposal requirements and ensuring compliance with internal policy and regulations.

With systems being made up of people, process and technology, the line between data steward and system owner is pretty vague. When a technology is linked to a single system or process it makes sense for them to be the same person (or team), for example a document management system. However, most technology platforms are across multiple systems or processes (for example an ERP or Quality Management System) and it is critical to look at the technology holistically as the data steward. I think we are all familiar with the problems that can be created by the same piece of data being treated differently between workflows in a technology platform.

As organizations evolve their data governance I think we will see the role of the data steward become more and more part of the standard quality toolbox, as the competencies are pretty similar.

PIC/S Guidance of Deficiency Classification

The Pharmaceutical Inspection Convention Cooperation Scheme (PIC/S) on 01-Jan-2019 released a long-awaited guidance to help regulators harmonize the classification and reporting of good manufacturing practice (GMP) deficiency outcomes from inspections. The guidance is designed as a “tool to support the risk-based classification of GMP deficiencies from inspections and to establish consistency amongst inspectorates.”

PI 040-1 “Guidance on Classification of GMP Deficiencies

Avalanche or Roadblock: FDA Publishes Flurries of Biologic and Biosimilar Materials

The proposed technical correction regulation, the other two guidance documents, and the list deal with the transition of certain biological products from NDAs to BLAs.  Starting with the simplest, the proposed (so-called) technical correction would amend the definition of “biological product” in 21 C.F.R. § 600.3(h) to conform to the definition implemented in the BPCIA and provide an interpretation of the statutory terms “protein” and “chemically synthesized polypeptide.”  FDA calls it a “technical correction” in the proposed rule, but this isn’t really technical, nor is it a correction.  Indeed, it reflects a significant change to the definition of biological product because the rule would replace the phrase  “means any” with the phrase “means a” and would add the phrase “protein (except any chemically synthesized polypeptide)” to the definition of “biological product.”  Consistent with the April 2015 Questions & Answers guidance, the proposed rule would amend 21 C.F.R. § 600.3(h) to further define protein as any alpha amino acid polymer with a specific defined sequence that is greater than 40 amino acids in size, and the term chemically synthesized polypeptide as any alpha amino acid polymer that: (1) is made entirely by chemical synthesis and (2) is greater than 40 amino acids but less than 100 amino acids in size.  Given that that FDA has been using this definition since the publication of the April 2015 final version of this Question and Answer guidance,  this proposed regulation is unlikely to catch industry by surprise.  But this is just one of multiple steps FDA is taking to prepare industry for the March 2020 transition of certain biological products approved under NDAs to BLAs.
— Read on www.fdalawblog.net/2019/01/avalanche-or-roadblock-fda-publishes-flurries-of-biologic-and-biosimilar-materials/