MHRA on Good Pharacovigilance Inspections

The MHRA GPvP inspectorate recently published their latest inspection metrics for the period from April 2019 to March 2020. 

Someday these reports won’t take a year to write. If I took a year writing my annual reports I would receive an inspection finding from the MHRA.

There is no surprise that the five critical observations are all from risk management. Risk management is also the largest source of major findings, with quality management a close second with a lot of growth.

There are a lot of observations around the smooth and effective running of the CAPA program; a fair amount on PSMF management; and a handful on procedure, training and oversight.

Looking at the nine major observations due to deficiencies in the management of CAPA, the MHRA reports these problems:

  • Delays to CAPA development
  • CAPA that did not address the root cause and impact analysis for the identified noncompliance
  • Open CAPA which were significantly past their due date
  • CAPA raised from a previous critical finding raised at an earlier MHRA inspection had not been addressed

I’m going to go out on a limb here and say some of these stem from companies thinking non-GMP CAPAs do not require the same level of control and scrutiny. Root Cause Analysis and a good CAPA program are fundamental, no matter where you fall on (or out of) the pharmaceutical regulatory spectrum.

MHRA on Passing the Baton from GPvP to GMP

I love the MHRA Inspectorate blog. They don’t write often, but when they do, good stuff. Here are some of my thoughts on the post on moving patient safety data from determination as part of the pharmacovigilance efforts to labeling to distribution.

Starting in the Good Pharmacovigilance Practice (GPvP) realm, triggers for updates may be identified by pharmacovigilance staff and the corresponding variations submitted by regulatory affairs staff, who will also receive notification of variation approval. At this stage Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) processes come into play with arrangements for printing the updated leaflets and incorporating these into the supply chain.

MHRA Inspectporate Blog “Passing the baton from GPvP to GMP: Three top tips for protecting patients and staying compliant ” 17 Dec 2019

Unless otherwise stated, updates to patient information leaflets should be introduced within 3 to 6 months of approval” – this is the critical point stressed in this post. The recommendations given in the blog post are solid.

Blog RecommendationThoughts
Check that the end to end process facilitates the timely implementation of updates and that there is seamless transition from written procedures covering GPvP, regulatory affairs and GMP processes. Labeling is often a separate change control process. Integration and simplification in change management is critical and companies should look seriously at balkanization of systems.
Define what is meant by ‘implementation’ of an updated leaflet and make sure this is in advance of regulatory deadlines to prevent the need for batches being re-worked should there be any unexpected delays Effective dates on changes need to take into account deadlines.

Appropriate linkages to ERP and supply chain systems.
Ensure the QP has access to up to date information on the correct leaflet version that should be used at batch certification. Communication, and the use of integrated change management

I also read this morning Teresa Gorecki’s post “Dedicated, Integrated Quality Assurance Systems Critical to Successful Clinical Trials.” All of her points are highly relevant here.