What is in a title

Recently I’ve seen a few inspection observations that have provided an observation on the title of quality record (e.g. deviation, CAPA, change control).

The title might seem the most basic part of a quality system record – a simple task – but instead it should receive some serious thought. This is any inspector’s first interaction, it serves as a historical flag that generations of readers will use to become familiar. And everyone falls prey to “judging a book by its cover.” This cognitive bias tends to make readers considerably susceptible to allowing the quality systems title to function as the sole factor influencing their decision of whether to read or skip a record. A bad title could shape an inspection or deprive an important historical record from being evaluated in the future. We can do better.

A good quality systems record title:

  • Condenses the record’s content in a few words
  • Differentiates the record from other records of the same subject area

Some general tips:

  1. Keep it simple and brief: The primary function of a title is to provide a precise summary of the record’s content. So keep the title brief and clear. Use active verbs instead of complex noun-based phrases, and avoid unnecessary details. Moreover, a good title for a record is typically around 10 to 12 words long. A lengthy title may seem unfocused and take the readers’ attention away from an important point.
  2. Avoid: Wrong label issued

    Better: Sample ABCD was issued label 1234 instead of label X4572

  3. Use appropriate descriptive words: A record title should contain key words used in the record and should define the nature of the quality systems event. Think about terms people would use to search for your record and include them in your title.
  4. Avoid: No LIMS label for batch ABDC

    Better: Batch ABDC was missing label Y457 as required by procedure LAB-123

  5. Avoid abbreviations and jargon: Known abbreviations can be used in the title. However, other lesser-known or specific abbreviations and jargon that would not be immediately familiar to the readers should be left out.

It sometimes surprises folks how simple things can have ripple effects. But they do, so plan accordingly and ensure your users are trained on writing a good title. Trust me; it will make things easier in the long run.

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