21st Anniversary

I don’t write much about personal stuff on my blog, but today is my 21st anniversary, so I think it’s appropriate.

I think any good relationship is an exercise in continuous improvement. There are mistakes made, people grow in different ways, things change, and let’s be honest we grow a lot in understanding of the other person. I think that understanding never ever ends.

When you start a relationship, you don’t really know the other person. It is only through time and experiences do you get to know them. And maybe you don’t always like what you get to know. And in my relationship with Jess that’s been the case. And again being honest, it has really been on both sides (maybe a little more towards me).

For me, it has really become a joy in discovering new levels, new details, and new depths to my partner. I love what it means to be in a relationship with a person who is continually growing and continually has new things, and new depths to discover.

So happy Anniversary Jess. I Love you.

The Supreme Court’s Decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health is a Bleak One for the Life Sciences Industry

I think it is no secret that I inherently view Quality as a progressive endeavor, and do not see eye-to-eye with colleagues who are conservative. How anyone can take our anti-Taylorist endeavor and not get to stands like the importance of human rights and the need to center those whose rights are challenged – like women – is beyond me. How can we stand for autonomy and not fight for the autonomy of all.

The silence of quality organizations is deafening.

What I want to write about now is how the roll-back of Roe in Dobbs should be a real clarion call to the life science industry, which needs to stop funding conservative politicians because those politicians do not have our best interests at heart.

The fight over Mifepristone and Misoprostol has already begun. The religious conservatives will go after it, and this reactionary court will need to gut the FD&C and the rest of the regulatory regime behind drugs in this country to let that happen. This will be really bad. It will cause life science companies to pull research, clinical trials, and manufacturing from this country as we will no longer be the gold standard in the life sciences. We will be a joke.

Take action:

  • Give to abortion funds
  • Check your company’s PAC and see exactly who it is giving to and make noise that funding anti-abortion, anti-science politicians is not acceptable
  • Support your colleagues. If you are male-identifying realize that most of your colleagues just got gut-punched today. Support them.

Sackler family sweetens deal to $6billion

I will not be happy with this story until every member of the Sackler family who was involved in the decision-making at Perdue is in jail and the family has lost every dollar they made. But I am heartened to see the failure of their failed bankruptcy ploy leading to the addition of another 1.5 billion in settlement.

Sackler family members to contribute up to $6 billion in latest agreement to resolve opioid claims

For the regulatory state to function there needs to be teeth, and quite frankly we do not see the teeth nearly enough.

Harvard Business Review – Whitewashing business executives is their core business

In the latest edition of “Executive utilizes Harvard Business Review to whitewash their activities” we have Hubert Joly, CEO of Best Buy, who informs us that we should all

  • Making meaningful purpose a genuine priority of business operations
  • The “human magic” of empowered and self-directed employees
  • Admitting you don’t have all the answers is a sign of strong leadership.

Let’s see how Best Buy puts those practices in place.

It is hard to take the editors of HBR seriously when they discuss what a good company culture looks like when they whitewash corporate leaders with this sort of track record.

Probably Best Buy paid a lot of money for the reputation bump just before Christmas.

Story is critical, or why tabletop roleplaying made me the quality professional I am today

I’ve written before on how storytelling is a critical skill. The ability to take data, take the events of the past and transform it into a coherent narrative is central to the quality profession, and frankly just about every other job out there.

This week I got one of my favorite compliments. We were working to take a series of events and shape it into a coherent narrative to explain what had happened, why we could be confident of the results, and how we had improved over time. And one of my co-workers had commented on how much they were learning from this process, and another responded that of course I was good at this because I was a gamer. And I was just tickled pink.

I make no secret of my hobby. My Twitter feed, for example, is one part geek, one part quality, one part politics. Search for me in google (and who doesn’t google search their coworkers?) and you’ll see gaming stuff on the front page. And in this day of working from home, my background is a bookshelf crammed full of games.

And I do think I am, to a large amount, the quality professional I am today because of that gaming background. There are many paths within quality, and this is part of mine.

Some of the things I’ve learned as a gamer include:

  • Storytelling skills
  • Communication skills
  • Organization skills
  • The ability to “think on your feet”
  • Humor
  • Patience
  • Creativity
  • Fairness
  • Knowledge of rules and how they work together in a system.
  • How to use visual aids, pictures et all
  • Paying attention to everyone, giving everyone a chance to be heroic
  • Conflict resolution skills

Which as a list definitely feels like the core of the profession.

So, fellow gamers in quality, next time we actually meet face-to-face at a conference, let’s find a little time to meet each other at the table.