ASQ Lean and Six Sigma Conference – Day 2

I ran into Stuart MacDonald, the magician from yesterday in several sessions today. I love when keynotes at a conference show their passion by learning from fellow practitioners. I bought his book, so it also worked on that level.

Morning Keynote of “Achieving Operational Excellence with Passion and Creativity” by Kaplan Mobray

As a facilitator I always approve of walking into a session with a name tag, file cards, paper, and crayons. It warms my heart.

Career coaches and motivational speakers are a tough one for me as I rarely connect with them as a conference speaker. Mr. Mobray had a high energy level, but what I really enjoyed was him using various facilitation techniques (graphic drawing) as a way to focus on his simple points, such as “pass it on” or “evolve” or “progress over persecution.”

“Steering Towards Zero Issues” by Franco Seravalli

Starts with the dilemma of poor quality and a high level overview of the case study at an automobile parts supplier in Costa Rica.

Though his case study covered their path root cause analysis and gap analysis and then went to improvement strategy.

  • People – Trust our people
  • Containment
  • Correction/Prevention

People was the most important.

Step by step process to create a quality culture and sell change.

Steps for strengthening people

Focus on people and talked about human error and human performance.

  • Awareness – create a sense of pride and empathy with the customer. Transparency and candor and making the quality issues public
  • Commitment – Public displays of support. Talk and listen. Management walking-the-walk
  • Empowerment – Trust your people, decision-making authority
  • Accountability – interesting point about cultural differences (for example Spanish and Portuguese do not have this word)
  • Recognition
Credit where credit is due

Containment – focused on stop the bleeding and close the circle. Containment is fairly high level and felt very industry specific in his details.

Corrective Actions – laid out the typical deviation to CAPA to effectiveness review path. Covered 8D, talking about need to add risk analysis/management and the place of effectiveness reviews.

Covers risk and PFMEAs.

Again, not an intermediate discussion. We need better criteria for ranking a session. I would have gone to this even if it was marked basic as the speaker is a member of the Team and Workplace Excellence Forum, but I worry for other participants.

“See One, Do One, Go Do One” by Karissa Craig

Karissa laid out a journey to develop, trial, implement, evaluate, and refine their approach through a case study.

Brings a good qualification approach to Lean with “See One” and “Do One” are classroom learning and the “Go Do One” is application.

Talked about the resistance and the need for accountability for application. A “want to” and not a “have to”

Demonstrated the A3 as rubric for the “Go Do One”. Offered some good discussion of how firefighter cultures (which healthcare) and how you need to build the right culture to do problem and root cause and not jump to solutions.

Gave a nice 8-week (with added 1-week pre, 1-week post) schedule for training and doing.

For training focused on basic problem solving, talked about avoiding perfectionism and set reasonable expectations. Karissa described a great sounding training program. This three hour class seemed very well put together.

Had an interesting share on how training led people to realize that problem solving was harder than they used to think and impacted employee engagement. This led to a sponsor training so sponsors understood how to support teams.

“Run with scissors” about how transformation involves risk and the ways to deal with it.

Rest of the Day

I spent the afternoon networking and connecting and conducting some ASQ Team and Workplace Excellence Forum business and didn’t attend any of the afternoon sessions. I was ambivalent about the afternoon keynote speaker/piano player.

ASQ BOSCON

The Boston Section of the ASQ is hosting the 39th annual BOSCON March 30-31, 2020 at the Airport Hilton hotel & conference center here in Boston.

ASQ BOSCON is proably the biggest and best run regional quality conference. I’ve been going for years and I highly recommend it to everyone.

The BOSCON 2020 theme is Performance Excellence—Your Competitive Edge. “To succeed in today’s digital economy, Quality must lead the way. Quality principles and practices are essential, but practitioners must innovate, learn and lead in how they are adapted to the digital age.”

The Team and Workplace Excellence Forum is proud to be a silver level sponsor. We firmly believe in quality’s role to build a culture of excellence, and that the challenges of the digital age are exciting ones to overcome.

A strongly recommended conference and I hope folks will be able to attend. Registration information can be found here.

There are also some good classes for certification preparation being offered after the conference for the Supplier Quality, Biomedical Auditor and Reliability Engineer certifications.

ASQ Audit Conference – Speaking

I’ll be a Session Speaker at the 2019 ASQ Audit Conference in Orlando, Florida on 17-18 October. My sessions “Lessons on Change Management from a Consent Decree Site” and “ Auditing the Quality System for Data integrity”, two topics I hope folks known I am passionate about.

The Food, Drug and Cosmetic Division is sponsoring a track of speakers and I volunteered to participate. I look forward to meeting anyone who is at the conference.

Top 5 Posts by Views in 2019 (first half)

With June almost over a look at the five top views for 2019. Not all of these were written in 2019, but I find it interesting what folks keep ending up at my blog to read.

  1. FDA signals – no such thing as a planned deviation: Since I wrote this has been a constant source of hits, mostly driven by search engines. I always feel like I should do a follow-up, but not sure what to say beyond – don’t do planned deviations, temporary changes belong in the change control system.
  2. Empathy and Feedback as part of Quality Culture: The continued popularity of this post since I wrote it in March has driven a lot of the things I am writing lately.
  3. Effective Change Management: Change management and change control are part of my core skill set and I’m gratified that this post gets a lot of hits. I wonder if I should build it into some sort of expanded master class, but I keep feeling I already have.
  4. Review of Audit Trails: Data Integrity is so critical these days. I should write more on the subject.
  5. Risk Management is about reducing uncertainty: This post really captures a lot of the stuff I am thinking about and driving action on at work.

Thinking back to my SWOT, and the ACORN test I did at the end of 2018, I feel fairly good about the first six months. I certainly wish I found time to blog more often, but that seems doable. And like most bloggers, I still am looking for ways to increase engagement with my posts and to spark conversations.