Warning Letter for Aurolife demonstrates failures in process validation

The FDA commented in a Warning Letter to Aurolife Pharma that the manufacturer lacked data showing that the process was in “state of control” before batch release. The 483 pointed to the FDA’s guidance document Process Validation: General Principles and Practices, and found the company lacks a state of control of the process, which comes back to change control.

They also found major deficiencies in their OOS and cleaning programs.

2020 483s on data integrity

Data integrity continued to be a focus of the FDA, though the reduced inspections definitely led to fewer 483s.

Reference NumberShort DescriptionLong Description2020 Frequency2019 Frequency2018 Frequency
21 CFR 211.194(a)Complete test data included in recordsLaboratory records do not include complete data derived from all tests, examinations and assay necessary to assure compliance with established specifications and standards.  Specifically, , ***153833
21 CFR 211.194(a)(4)Complete Test DataLaboratory records are deficient in that they do not include a complete record of all data obtained during testing.  Specifically, ***102428
21 CFR 211.68(b)Backup data not assured as exact and completeBackup data is not assured as [exact] [complete] [secure from alteration, erasure or loss] through keeping hard copy or alternate systems.  Specifically, ***6671
21 CFR 211.194(a)(4)Data secured in course of each testLaboratory records do not include a complete record of all data secured in the course of each test, including all [graphs] [charts] [spectra] from laboratory instrumentation, properly identified to show the [specific component] [drug product container] [closure] [in-process material] [lot tested] [drug product tested].  Specifically, ***4128
21 CFR 211.68(b)Written record not kept of program and validation dataA written record of the program along with appropriate validation data has not been maintained in situations where backup data is eliminated by computerization or other automated processes.  Specifically, ***1671
483s related to data integrity

2020 FDA 483s around change

The yearly database of 483s has been updated by the FDA. Lots will be written on themes as we end the year, so I decided to give a few of my immediate observations.

I find that over time what I focus in on changes, as my jobs evolve and change, and the interests I have shift. However, some things never change, so let us talk change.

Reference NumberShort DescriptionLong Description2020 Frequency2019 Frequency2018 Frequency
21 CFR 211.100(a)Changes to Procedures Not Reviewed, ApprovedChanges to written procedures are  not [drafted, reviewed and approved by the appropriate organizational unit] [reviewed and approved by the quality control unit].  Specifically, ***8139
21 CFR 211.160(a)Lab controls established, including changesThe establishment of [specifications] [standards] [sampling plans] [test procedures] [laboratory control mechanisms] including any changes thereto, are not [drafted by the appropriate organizational unit] [reviewed and approved by the quality control unit].  Specifically, ***41817
21 CFR 212.20(c)Adverse effects of changes madeYou did not demonstrate that any change does not adversely affect the [identity] [strength] [quality] [purity] of your PET drug. Specifically,***111
483s related to changes

I think its fair to say the decreases as a result of the pandemic and the reduced inspections.

Over on the device side of things we see:

Reference NumberShort DescriptionLong DescriptionFrequency
21 CFR 820.30(i)Design changes – Lack of or Inadequate ProceduresProcedures for design change have not been [adequately] established.  Specifically,***26
21 CFR 820.40(b)Document change records, maintained.Records of changes to documents were not [adequately] maintained.  Specifically, ***6
21 CFR 820.70(b)Production and Process Change Procedures, lack of or Inad.Procedures for changes to a [specification] [method] [process] [procedure] have not been [adequately] established.  Specifically, *** 5
21 CFR 820.75(c)Process changes – review, evaluation and revalidationA validated process was not [reviewed and evaluated] [revalidated] when changes or process deviations occurred. Specifically, ***5
21 CFR 820.40(b)Change records, contentRecords of changes did not include [a description of the change] [identification of the affected documents] [the signature of the approving official(s)] [the approval date] [when the change became effective].  Specifically, ***



3
21 CFR 820.50(b)Supplier notification of changesThere is no agreement with [suppliers] [contractors] [consultants] to notify you of changes in the product or service.  Specifically, ***3
21 CFR 820.75(c)Documentation – review in response to changes or deviationsThere is no documentation of the [review and evaluation of a process] [revalidation of a process] performed in response to changes or process deviations.  Specifically, ***1
Device 473s around change

I’m a firm believer that pharma should always pay attention to the medical device side for 483s. A lot of us are combination products now (or will be) and there is always good trends to be aware of.

My key takeaways:

  1. Think change management and not just change control and document control
  2. Computer change controls need to be holistic and system orientated
  3. Have a process that ensures changes are appropriately reviewed and approved
  4. Risk based and evaluate validation
  5. A robust supplier management program is critical, plan for change

Here’s a more detailed checklist to help you evaluate your change system.

FDA Foreign Drug Establishment Inspections – Congressional Testimony

Subcommittees of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce heard testimony last week from the Government Accountability Office’s Mary Denigan-Macauley and from Janet Woodcock, Director of FDA’s Center of Drug Evaluation and Research, about the state of FDA’s foreign drug establishment inspection program.

Deborah L. Livornese “Testimony About FDA’s Foreign Drug Establishment Inspection Program: GAO and FDA See Things Differently but Both Would Like to See a Fuller Glass.” FDA Law Blog. 16-Dec-2019

Good summary of recent testimony on FDA inspections outside the USA, especially China and India.

System failures are rarely due to the employee

Between January 2016 and May 2019, you recorded approximately 397 customer complaints related to container closure issues (e.g., approximately 60%), product separation, lack of effect and adverse events. Your quality unit failed to adequately review these complaints, identify trends, and implement effective CAPAs. During the inspection you explained that these lapses in quality system performance were due to underperforming staff, who had since been dismissed. In your response, you attributed these and other quality related issues to under staffing of the quality unit as your business expanded.

Your response is inadequate because you failed to appropriately address your quality unit not performing their required duties. Your firm must provide the quality unit with the appropriate authority, sufficient resources, and staff to carry out its responsibilities to consistently ensure drug quality.

FDA Warning Letter to Teligent Pharma, Inc. dated 26-November-2019

Continuing the trend of making me petrified about generics, this warning letter is a roller coaster read. One big set of failures to actually investigate and apply appropriate resources to the quality unit. And then the management had the gall to blame the employees.

80+ years of quality principles ignored. I personally thought the FDA was being overly nice.

There are basically three questions to answer:

  • Do you have a properly established, staffed, and managed Quality Unit?
  • Does your Quality Unit have appropriate responsibilities and authority?
  • Does your Quality Unit have access to the data it needs to make informed decisions?