FDA Foreign Drug Establishment Inspections – Congressional Testimony

Subcommittees of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce heard testimony last week from the Government Accountability Office’s Mary Denigan-Macauley and from Janet Woodcock, Director of FDA’s Center of Drug Evaluation and Research, about the state of FDA’s foreign drug establishment inspection program.

Deborah L. Livornese “Testimony About FDA’s Foreign Drug Establishment Inspection Program: GAO and FDA See Things Differently but Both Would Like to See a Fuller Glass.” FDA Law Blog. 16-Dec-2019

Good summary of recent testimony on FDA inspections outside the USA, especially China and India.

System failures are rarely due to the employee

Between January 2016 and May 2019, you recorded approximately 397 customer complaints related to container closure issues (e.g., approximately 60%), product separation, lack of effect and adverse events. Your quality unit failed to adequately review these complaints, identify trends, and implement effective CAPAs. During the inspection you explained that these lapses in quality system performance were due to underperforming staff, who had since been dismissed. In your response, you attributed these and other quality related issues to under staffing of the quality unit as your business expanded.

Your response is inadequate because you failed to appropriately address your quality unit not performing their required duties. Your firm must provide the quality unit with the appropriate authority, sufficient resources, and staff to carry out its responsibilities to consistently ensure drug quality.

FDA Warning Letter to Teligent Pharma, Inc. dated 26-November-2019

Continuing the trend of making me petrified about generics, this warning letter is a roller coaster read. One big set of failures to actually investigate and apply appropriate resources to the quality unit. And then the management had the gall to blame the employees.

80+ years of quality principles ignored. I personally thought the FDA was being overly nice.

There are basically three questions to answer:

  • Do you have a properly established, staffed, and managed Quality Unit?
  • Does your Quality Unit have appropriate responsibilities and authority?
  • Does your Quality Unit have access to the data it needs to make informed decisions?

FDA 483 data

The FDA has posted the 2019 483 observations as an excel file. The FDA has made these files available every year since 2006 and I find them to be one of my favorite tools for evaluating regulatory trends.

So for example, looking at change related 483 I see:

2019 vs 2018 483 comparison for short description including “change”

Or for data integrity issues:

2019 vs 2018 483 comparison for short description including “data”

Very useful resource that should be in the bookmarks for every pharmaceutical quality professional.

Driving for Mature Quality Organizations – FDA recent perspective

Theresa Mullin, FDA’s Associate Director for Strategic Initiatives for the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research recently gave a presentation “Update from FDA CDER” at GMP by the Sea (I need to go to that that some-year).

As in other FDA presentations this presentation summarized the Quality Metrics Research Final Report by the University of St. Gallen as the appropriate steps to ensure quality maturity:

  1. Optimized set-up and cleaning procedures are documented as best practice process and rolled out throughout the whole plant.
  2. A large percentage of equipment on the shop floor is currently under statistical process control.
  3. For root cause analysis, the firm has standardized tools to get a deeper understanding of the influencing factors for problems.
  4. Goals and objectives of the manufacturing unit are closely linked and consistent with corporate objectives and the site has a clear focus.
  5. Manufacturers have joint improvement programs with suppliers to increase performance.
  6. All potential bottleneck machines are identified and supplied with additional spare parts.
  7. For product and process transfers between different units or sites,standardized procedures exist that ensure a fast, stable and compliant knowledge transfer.
  8. Charts showing the current performance status such as current scrap rates and current up times are posted on the shop floor and visible for everyone.
  9. The firm regularly surveys customers’ requirements.
  10. The firm ranks its suppliers and conducts supplier qualifications and audits.

This are some pretty low hanging fruit. They are also the pretty necessary in any organization, not just pharmaceuticals.

There was also a little discussion on the use of Q10 that really makes me wish I had been there to hear exactly what was said. I hope it was “Just freaking implement it already.”

In general, useful slides, I recommend going and checking them out.