The FDA and Prescription Drugs: Current Controversies in Context

Harvard is offering a free course though edX on how the FDA regulates pharmaceuticals and explore debates on prescription drug costs, marketing, and testing.
— Check out  www.edx.org/course/the-fda-and-prescription-drugs-current-controversies-in-context

According to the syllabus, the course will be set up with six modules:

Module 1: Overview and history of the FDA
Module 2: Drug development and approval
Module 3: Drug pricing in the United States
Module 4: Marketing strategies
Module 5: Post-approval evaluation
Module 6Emerging medical technologies

An Analysis Of FDA FY2018 Drug GMP Warning Letters

BioProcess Online has a nice summary of the drug GMP warning letters issued in FY2018, as well as a comparison of trends since fiscal year 2013.
— Read on www.bioprocessonline.com/doc/an-analysis-of-fda-fy-drug-gmp-warning-letters-0003

Data Integrity definitely continues to be a theme, and I agree that we are seeing a growing trend around process validation. I also think root cause investigations was a theme of 2018 that we are going to be seeing a lot more of.

FDA draft guidance – Continuous Manufacturing

The FDA published today a new draft guidance “Quality Considerations for Continuous Manufacturing Guidance for Industry.” Which, together with ICH plans continues to demonstrate the emphasis on continuous manufacturing.

More a set of questions than anything else, this is a good document for those who are grappling with the challenges of continuous manufacturing.

FDA launching pilot program on established conditions

The FDA has announced a pilot program to “propose explicit established conditions (ECs) as part of an original new drug application (NDA),
abbreviated new drug application (ANDA), biologics license application
(BLA), or as a prior approval supplement (PAS) to any of these.”

As the FDA mentioned, this is a followup of two draft guidances: The 2015 FDA ‘‘Established Conditions: Reportable CMC Changes for Approved Drug and Biologic Products’’and the draft Q12.

It is exciting to see Q12 move forward. We can argue about its imperfections, but at the end of the day this is a big step for the industry.

Avalanche or Roadblock: FDA Publishes Flurries of Biologic and Biosimilar Materials

The proposed technical correction regulation, the other two guidance documents, and the list deal with the transition of certain biological products from NDAs to BLAs.  Starting with the simplest, the proposed (so-called) technical correction would amend the definition of “biological product” in 21 C.F.R. § 600.3(h) to conform to the definition implemented in the BPCIA and provide an interpretation of the statutory terms “protein” and “chemically synthesized polypeptide.”  FDA calls it a “technical correction” in the proposed rule, but this isn’t really technical, nor is it a correction.  Indeed, it reflects a significant change to the definition of biological product because the rule would replace the phrase  “means any” with the phrase “means a” and would add the phrase “protein (except any chemically synthesized polypeptide)” to the definition of “biological product.”  Consistent with the April 2015 Questions & Answers guidance, the proposed rule would amend 21 C.F.R. § 600.3(h) to further define protein as any alpha amino acid polymer with a specific defined sequence that is greater than 40 amino acids in size, and the term chemically synthesized polypeptide as any alpha amino acid polymer that: (1) is made entirely by chemical synthesis and (2) is greater than 40 amino acids but less than 100 amino acids in size.  Given that that FDA has been using this definition since the publication of the April 2015 final version of this Question and Answer guidance,  this proposed regulation is unlikely to catch industry by surprise.  But this is just one of multiple steps FDA is taking to prepare industry for the March 2020 transition of certain biological products approved under NDAs to BLAs.
— Read on www.fdalawblog.net/2019/01/avalanche-or-roadblock-fda-publishes-flurries-of-biologic-and-biosimilar-materials/