Engaging for Quality

When building a quality organization, we are striving to do three things: get employees (and executives) to feel the need for quality in their bones; get them to understand what quality is and why it is important; and build the process, procedure, and tools to make quality happen. Practitioners in change management often call this heart, head, and hands.

Engage the heart, head and hands to build a quality culture

In our efforts we strive to answer give major themes of questions about why building a culture of quality is critical.

ThemeQuestions
WhyWhy do we need quality? Why is it important? What are the regulatory expectations? What happens if we do nothing?
WhatWhat results are expected for our patients? Our organization? Our people? What does out destination look and feel like?
HowHow will we get there? What’s our plan and process? What new behaviors do we each need to demonstrate?
YouWhat do you need to fulfill your role in quality? What do we need from you?
MeWhat do I commit to as a leader? What will I do to make change a reality? How will I support my team?
Five Themes of Change

The great part of this is that the principles of building a quality culture are the same mindsets we want embedded in our culture. By demonstrating them, we build and strengthen the culture, and will reap the dividends.

Be Preventative: What actions can be taken to prevent undesirable/unintended consequences with employees and other stakeholders. We do this by:

  • Involving end-users in the design process
  • Conduct risk assessments and lessons learned to predict possible failures
  • Ensure the reason for change is holistic and accounts for all internal and external obligations
  • Determine metrics as soon as possible
  • Focus on how the organization is responding to ongoing change
  • Think through how roles need to change and what employees need to be accountable for

Be Proactive: What actions can be taken to successfully meet objectives?

Be Responsive: What evidence-based techniques can be used to respond to issues, including resistance?

This is all about leveraging the 8 change accelerators and effectively developing strategies for change.

Understanding the Levers of Change

As part of my presentation “Sustaining Change – Executing a Sustainability Plan” at the ASQ Lean and Six Sigma Conference tomorrow I’ll be talking about levers of change.

Understanding the change landscape

Change Management practitioners usually talk about seven levers:

  1. Infrastructure – Investing in the tools, processes, and other resources that employees need to be successful with the change initiative.
  2. Walk the Talk – active leadership is about ownership; it includes making the business case clear, modeling behaviors, clearing obstacles and making course corrections.
  3. Reward and Recognition – acknowledgement and compensation for employees who work to move the initiative forward
  4. Mass Exposure – getting out information about the change through broadcast messages and other communication pathways
  5. Personal Contacts – creating opportunities for advocates to share their experience of the change with peers who feel disengaged
  6. Outside advocates – bringing in resources (internal or external) to gain expertise for the change initiative
  7. Shift Resisters – moving people to areas less affected by the initiative.
7 levers of change