Change Leader Competency

Luigi Sille on sharequality answered the June 2019 ASQ Roundtable Topic asks: “How can an individual become a successful Change Leader?” I’m a big fan of both blog carnivals and change management so here goes my answer, which is pretty similar to Luigi’s, and I would guess many other’s – just with my own spin.

A few things immediately come to mind.

Change management (and this is another great example of really meaning people change management) should be a competency on the ladder for any quality professional. It certainly needs to be a core area for anyone in a quality leadership position.

There are a lot of competency models out there for change management. Instead of pointing to just one, let’s try to find what they actually have in common. To do so it is important to set out the critical activities of change management:

  1. Define the change
  2. Ensure change delivers value
  3. Stakeholder strategy
  4. Communication and engagement
  5. Assess change impact
  6. Project management

In order to do these it is important to be able to provide education and learning support, facilitation, team effectiveness and understand how to sustain systems.

Change Management requires the seven skills we should all be developing: communication, content, context, emotional competence, teaching, connections, and an ethical compass

Change Management is part of the core for any quality leader, together with continuous improvement and knowledge management.

Change Management – Post Change Evaluation and Action

In “Change Management – Post Change Evaluation and Action” John Hunter (of CuriousCat) writes a nice post on the The W. Edwards Deming Institute Blog on linking change management to the PDSA (PDCA) lifecycle focusing on Act.

Post Change Evaluation is often called the effectiveness review, and is a critical part of change in the pharmaceutical quality system, and frankly is important no matter the industry.

An effectiveness review is the success criteria of the change viewed over enough data points based on a methodology informed by the nature of the change and risk.

 The success criteria should be achieved. If not, reasons why they have not been achieved should be assessed along with the mitigation steps to address the reasons why, including reverting to the previous operating state where appropriate. This may require the proposal of a subsequent change or amendment of the implementation plan to ensure success. Here we see the loop aspects of the PDSA lifecycle.

All changes should have a way back into knowledge management. The knowledge gathered from implementation of the change should be shared with the development function and other locations, as appropriate, to ensure that learning can be applied in products under development or to similar products manufactured at the same or other locations.

When choosing success criteria always strive for leading indicators that tell you how the change is working. Deviations are an awful way to judge the effectiveness of the change. Instead look for walkthroughs, checklists, audits, data gathering. Direct observation and real-time gathering and analysis of data of any sort is the best.

As mentioned above, ensure the change management/change control system is set up to deal with the inevitable change that does not work. Have a clear set of instructions on how to make that decision (returning to the success criteria), what steps to take to mitigate and what to do next. For example having guidance of when to create a deviation and on how to make a decision to rollback versus implement another change.

Risk Management leads to Change Management, Change Management contains Risk Management

We did an FMEA for the design of the room. Why do we need a risk assessment for the change control to implement the design features?

We have an environmental risk management plan, including a HAACP. Why does this change control require a new risk assessment?

If I received a nickel……

I want to expand on my earlier thoughts on risk management enabling change.

Risk Management is a key enabler of any quality by design, whether of product, facility or equipment. We do living risk assessments to understand the scope of our ongoing risk. Inevitably we either want to implement that new or improved design or we want to mitigate the ongoing risks in our operation. So we turn to change management. And as part of that change management we do a risk assessment. Our change management then informs ongoing risk review.

Risk Management Leads to Change Management

Design Implementation

Through your iterative design lifecycle there is a final design ready for introduction. Perhaps this is a totally new thing, perhaps it is a new set of equipment or processes, or just a modification.

All along through the iterative design lifecycle risk management has been applied to establish measurable, testable, unambiguous and traceable performance requirements. Now your process engages with change management to introduce the change.

And a new risk assessment is conducted.

This risk assessment is asking a different question. During the interative design lifecycle the risk question is some form of “What are the risks from this design on the patient/process.” As part of risk management, the question is “What are the risks to SISPQ/GMP from introducing the change.”

This risk assessment is narrower, in that it looks at the process of implementing. Broader that it looks at the entirety of your operations: facility, supply chain, quality system, etc.

The design risk assessment and risk management activities informs the change management risk assessment, but it cannot replace them. They also can serve to lower the rigor of the change management risk assessment, allowing the use of a less formal tool.

Living Risk Reviews

risk leads to change

In the third phase of risk management – risk review – we confirm that the risks identified and mitigated as planned and are functioning as intended. We also evaluate to see if any additional, previously unpredicted risks have appeared. Risk review is the living part of the lifecycle as we return to it on a periodic basis.

From this will come new mitigations, targeted to address the identified risks. These mitigations inevitably lead to change management.

We again do a new risk assessment focusing on the risk of implementing the change. Informed by the living risk assessment, we can often utilize a less formal tool to look at the full ramifications of introducing the mitigation (a change).

Change Controls contains Risk Management

risk and change management connections

Effective change management is enabled by risk management.

Each and every change requires a risk assessment to capture the risks of the change. This ICHQ10 requirement is the best way to determine if the change is acceptable.

This risk assessment evaluates the impact on the change on the facility, equipment, materials, supply chain, processes. testing, quality systems and everything else. It is one of the critical reasons it is crucial to involve the right experts.

From this risk assessment comes the appropriate actions before implementing the change, as well as appropriate follow-up activities and it can help define the effectiveness review.

What about grouped change controls?

Depends. Sometimes the risk management looks at the individual implementations. Othertimes you need to do separate ones. Many times the risk assessment lead you to breaking up one change control into many. Evaluate as follows:

  • Are the risks from the separate implementations appropriately captured
  • Are the risks from pauses between implementations appropriately captured
  • As the ripples appropriately understood

Change Management Leads back to Risk Management

Sometimes a change control requires a specific risk assessment to be updated, or requires specific risk management to happen.

What about HAACP?

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) are great tools for risk assessments. They are often the catalyst for doing a change, they are often the artifact of a change. They should never be utilized for determining the impact of a change.

A hazard is any biological, chemical, or physical property that impacts human safety. The HAACP identifies and establishes critical limits. But a HAACP is not the tool to use to determine if a change should move forward and what actions to do. It is to static.

In Closing

Risk Management is an enabler for change, a tenet enshrined in the ICH guidances. We are engaging in risk management activities throughout our organizations. It is critical to understand how the various risk management activities fit together and how they should be separated.

Don’t Just Tell Employees Organizational Changes Are Coming — Explain Why

To be successful, your story needs to start with the company’s core mission and then offer a compelling and inspiring future vision. You want to answer: How are the changes you make today helping you achieve your vision for tomorrow?
Don’t Just Tell Employees Organizational Changes Are Coming — Explain Why by Morgan Galbraith

I can’t stress enough the importance of proper communication around all changes, from the large transformations on down. Effective communication is effective change management.

I’ve discussed the need to be able to identify changes to strategic plans and use that to inspire, inform, empower, and engage.

changing business environment

Always spend the time on a good communication plan:

Information to Communicate
(What)
Objective
(Why)
Target Audience
(Who to)
Frequency
(When)
Start Date
(When)
End Date
(When)
Media
(How)
Responsible
(Who from)
Deliverable Comments
What to people need to know o Determine site readiness to start the project

o Define resource needs and availability

Tailor the communication to specific audiences. The same information is sometimes presented different ways How often? Start date End Date From face-to-face to all the other communication tools available in the modern workplace. Be creative Who is responsible for completing the communication What will execution look like  

 

FDA signals – no such thing as a planned deviation

The subject of planned deviations made for a raucous “Breakfast with the FDA” session Sept. 25 at the Parenteral Drug Association/FDA conference in Washington.

These are the deviations from standard operating procedures that workers carry out on purpose, typically to keep a pharmaceutical plant operating when for one reason or another they won’t be doing it the way the company said they would.

FDA Compliance Experts Advise Against Treating Minor Changes As ‘Planned Deviations’” – Bowman Cox, Pink Sheet

I wish I had gone to the PDA/FDA conference this year, if for nothing else to have been able to stand up and cheer wildly when this was said:

Brooke Higgins, a senior policy advisor in the FDA drug center’s Office of Compliance, agreed that “it’s a very strange term, and it kind of makes your skin crawl a little bit.”

There is a whole lot more good stuff over at the Pink Sheet’s summary.

I am a firm believer that there are no such things as planned changes. There are change controls, some of which are temporary, occasionally even ones that are retroactive (deviation identifies a change which is formalized in a change control). But all are through the same system, with the same evaluations and assessments and the same sorts of actions.

Keep all changes together. Its a true best practice.