FDA launching pilot program on established conditions

The FDA has announced a pilot program to “propose explicit established conditions (ECs) as part of an original new drug application (NDA),
abbreviated new drug application (ANDA), biologics license application
(BLA), or as a prior approval supplement (PAS) to any of these.”

As the FDA mentioned, this is a followup of two draft guidances: The 2015 FDA ‘‘Established Conditions: Reportable CMC Changes for Approved Drug and Biologic Products’’and the draft Q12.

It is exciting to see Q12 move forward. We can argue about its imperfections, but at the end of the day this is a big step for the industry.

PIC/S Guidance of Deficiency Classification

The Pharmaceutical Inspection Convention Cooperation Scheme (PIC/S) on 01-Jan-2019 released a long-awaited guidance to help regulators harmonize the classification and reporting of good manufacturing practice (GMP) deficiency outcomes from inspections. The guidance is designed as a “tool to support the risk-based classification of GMP deficiencies from inspections and to establish consistency amongst inspectorates.”

PI 040-1 “Guidance on Classification of GMP Deficiencies

Avalanche or Roadblock: FDA Publishes Flurries of Biologic and Biosimilar Materials

The proposed technical correction regulation, the other two guidance documents, and the list deal with the transition of certain biological products from NDAs to BLAs.  Starting with the simplest, the proposed (so-called) technical correction would amend the definition of “biological product” in 21 C.F.R. § 600.3(h) to conform to the definition implemented in the BPCIA and provide an interpretation of the statutory terms “protein” and “chemically synthesized polypeptide.”  FDA calls it a “technical correction” in the proposed rule, but this isn’t really technical, nor is it a correction.  Indeed, it reflects a significant change to the definition of biological product because the rule would replace the phrase  “means any” with the phrase “means a” and would add the phrase “protein (except any chemically synthesized polypeptide)” to the definition of “biological product.”  Consistent with the April 2015 Questions & Answers guidance, the proposed rule would amend 21 C.F.R. § 600.3(h) to further define protein as any alpha amino acid polymer with a specific defined sequence that is greater than 40 amino acids in size, and the term chemically synthesized polypeptide as any alpha amino acid polymer that: (1) is made entirely by chemical synthesis and (2) is greater than 40 amino acids but less than 100 amino acids in size.  Given that that FDA has been using this definition since the publication of the April 2015 final version of this Question and Answer guidance,  this proposed regulation is unlikely to catch industry by surprise.  But this is just one of multiple steps FDA is taking to prepare industry for the March 2020 transition of certain biological products approved under NDAs to BLAs.
— Read on www.fdalawblog.net/2019/01/avalanche-or-roadblock-fda-publishes-flurries-of-biologic-and-biosimilar-materials/

The Future of Quality Control

While most of the advanced technologies already exist today, few pharmaceutical companies have yet to see any significant benefits. On one side, quality leaders struggle to define a clear business case for the technological changes, and thus fail to bring to management attention to the significant impact potential associated with lab digitization or automation. On the other side, companies often neglect the development of a clear long-term lab evolution strategy and blueprint, which can lead to some costly investments with unclear benefits.
— Read on https://www.pharmamanufacturing.com/articles/2018/the-future-of-quality-control/

Good overview of some current trends in QC labs.

Q13 and Q14 path forward

Final concept papers have been published for the next two ICH quality guidelines. In both cases we can hope to see drafts in the first half of 2020. Both guidelines are intended to supplement the existing documents ICH Q8 – ICH Q12, reinforcing the principles of a risk based quality by design (QbD).

ICH Q13: Continuous Manufacturing of Drug Substances and Drug Products

Final concept paper and business plan. This new quality guideline will:

  • capture key technical and regulatory considerations including certain CGMP elements specific to continuous manufacturing
  • allow drug manufacturers to employ flexible approaches to develop, implement, or integrate continuous manufacturing for the manufacture of small molecules and therapeutic proteins for new and existing products
  • provide guidance to industry and regulatory agencies regarding regulatory expectations on the development, implementation, and assessment of continuous manufacturing technologies.

ICH Q2/Q14: Analytical Procedure Development

Concept paper and business plan. Q14 will bring the QbD principles to analytical development.

In the course of the preparation of this new guideline, ICH Q2 (Validation of Analytical Procedures) will also be revised. It will be adapted to the state of the art to include modern analytical methods in the future..

It’s stated that the Expert Working Group (EWG) will evaluate combining Q2 and Q14 into one document. Here’s hoping.