WCQI 2022 Day 2

Ugwem Eneyo’s keynote this morning was interesting and the type of inspiring keynote about the importance of quality that I love to hear.

QMS for Data-Driven Decision-Making

Charles Cox starts up being a little by blurring the differences between a Quality Management System (QMS) and an electronic Quality Management System (eQMS), but quickly solidified his topic of how to foundational build digital data into the QMS in an iterative approach for decision data decision-marking and growth.

I appreciate a quality-function-deployment (QFD) approach, a tool-set that I feel folks take a little for granted and don’t utilize enough. Charles co-wrote a useful text on QFD back in the 90s, but I really haven’t read a lot from him in recent years, so this presentation is an excellent example of a practical application, updated for today.

The focus on thinking today about the needs of the future is one that we cannot stress enough. Future sense-making is a core competency for quality professionals and one we do not spend enough time discussing and performing deliberative practice on.

Aligning Organizational Structure with Quality 4.0 by Jane Keathley

Jane co-wrote a thought provoking book on organizational design – Structuring Your Organization For Innovation.

I’m always surprised when folks refer to open office plans in a positive light. The research is pretty definitive on the destructive aspects here.

Thinking about the various organization chart structures is key. In pharma, the regulations are pretty clear on the need to do this, I think a lot of organizations struggle on how to build their organizations for quality. Color me a bit pessimistic here, but I want to see network structures work but have not had the experience.

The four criteria or organizational structures influence on performance: formality, hierarchy, complexity, technology.

Provides three perspectives for organization design: Strategic, Operational, Tactical.

I think there could have been a whole session just on the vision matrix. Same for organizational network analysis. Both of these are tools I do not think enough quality folks are comfortable with. Would make a good workshop.

tratVision Matrix – the Strategic Perspetive

And I got a free book for being a know-it-all about holacracy, which means I now have 2. I’ll keep this copy because I’ll get it signed, and pass off the copy at home.

I should put McKinsey on my junk science bingo card. Support for a criminal enterprise seems to be pretty garbage.

Key message – push decision making and autonomy down as low as possible.

And then I spoke

Good turn out. I was happy with the volume of questions.

Enabling the Process Owner to Drive Improvement

The process owner is a central part of business process management yet is often the one we take for granted. In this session, the speaker will share through case study how organizations can build strong process owners and leverage them to drive improvement in a highly regulated environment. Participants in this session will learn: ~how to identify process owners and competencies for success, ~how to build a change management program that leverages process owners as the guiding coalition, and ~how to create and execute a training program for process owners

2022 ASQ WORLD CONFERENCE ON QUALITY & IMPROVEMENT

The presentation I gave at the 2022 World Conference on Quality & Improvement.

Powerpoint Slides

With the current plan to start attending conferences again this spring, I’ve been working a lot on a few different presentations, which means spending a lot of time on PowerPoint presentations.

Microsoft debuted PowerPoint in 1987, and since then, it has been used to present content in meetings, conference rooms, and classrooms. There are a lot of jokes about how bad PowerPoint can be, but if you know a little about its features, PowerPoint can be so much more than mere presentation software. It can be the means for taking audiences on a truly engaging learning adventure as well as a powerful tool that supports presenters by serving as their digital co-facilitator. It just requires some work.

Making presentations for folks outside my organization always gets me thinking of best practices. It helps me concentrate on how the true value of PowerPoint isn’t to serve as an information provider—that’s the role of a presenter. The true value of PowerPoint
is to support you and your presentation.

A presentation is most effective when it is focused and has a coherent narrative. Achieving that starts with defining your objectives and then taking some time to figure out how you’ll meet those objectives. Be intentional in your use of PowerPoint.

Traditional PowerPoint ThinkingIntentional PowerPoint Design Thinking
Every presentation needs slides.My intended presentation outcomes should dictate
the types of visual aids I use (or don’t use).
Every point I make needs a slide.My slides should never compete with me for the audience’s attention; they should support my message.
PowerPoint is synonymous with your presentation.PowerPoint is my co-facilitator.
PowerPoint is linear, and slides appear sequentially.Using triggers and hyperlinks, it’s possible to reveal information dynamically.
Templates make a slide deck look professional.Effective use of slide real estate and visual representation of my message looks professional.
There is a maximum number of words and an ideal font size for most presentations.My audience should be able to read all the words that appear on a slide.
People need a lot of information on technical slides and data-driven presentations.Slides are a visual aid for a presentation; more
detailed information is better offered through
handouts.
There are lots of options for animations and transitions, so they should all be used at some point.Animations and transitions can help focus attention, but there is such a thing as too much.
I can send someone my PowerPoint deck and that should be the equivalent of attending my presentation.Most narratives can be placed in the Notes section and distributed, along with my slides, to paint a complete picture for those not in attendance.
What’s Possible with PowerPoint?

Give a lot of thought to who is your audience. It is always a good idea to understand your audience, but when speaking to folks outside of your What (if anything) does the potential audience already know about your topic? What should the audience be able to do new, different, or better because of the time spent with you?

For example, at the upcoming ISPE Asceptic Conference, my audience understands pharmaceutical quality systems so I can start with the understanding that they understand the basics of my topic. My presentation, as a result, can go to more advanced topics and not have to explain the basics.

A presentation is most effective when it is focused and has a coherent narrative. Achieving that starts with defining your objectives and then taking some time to figure out how you’ll meet those objectives. Taking an hour or two to map out your thoughts and truly think through how best to visually represent your key points can help ensure that your presentation will be tight and focused with a coherent flow.

For each slide:

  1. Slide Purpose/Objective
  2. Sketch/Imagery
  3. Key Points

Things Conferences Should Change

Working on presentations for conferences again really reminds me of all the bad practices conferences continue to use.

  1. Stop Using Templates: It is a common misconception is that using a template makes the slide deck look more professional. Slide templates do help with consistency, but they dramatically reduce the real estate you have to work with on your slide. By the very nature of their structure, these templates encourage a title and bulleted list format. Don’t just believe me, watch this fun video by Will Thalheimer. The more space on a slide that is occupied by professional-looking template designs and logos, the less space remains for inserting powerful imagery, text, facts, or figures.
  2. Leverage Technology to Break Linearity: Most people use PowerPoint in linerar ways, and conference technology builds pretty much make that an inevitability. The technology exists to allow the audience to have some sort of control over the content that’s on display in front of them, and would greatly enhance the conference experience.

Resources

  • Bozarth, J. 2013. Better Than Bullet Points: Creating Engaging e-Learning with PowerPoint. 2nd ed. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Duarte, N. 2010. Resonate: Present Visual Stories that Transform Audiences. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Duarte, N. 2008. slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media.
  • Medina, J. 2014. Brain Rules (2nd ed.). Seattle: Pear Press.
  • Schwertly, S. 2011. How to be a Presentation God: Build, Design and Deliver Presentations that Dominate. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Vella, J. 2002. Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach: The Power of Dialogue in Educating Adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Williams, R. 2008. The Non-Designer’s Design Book. 3rd ed. Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press.
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

ASQ Webinar August 4, 2021

I am speaking with the ASQ’s Human Developlement and Leadership Division on August 4th at 3 pm eastern on “Trust & Adaptability: Servant Leadership Lessons from Joining an Organization During a Pandemic” exploring from what Steven M. R. Covey wrote in Ken Blanchard and Renee’s Broadwell’s book Servant Leadership in Action that the key outcome for a servant leader is trust. Trust and servant leadership are both built on intent. The Trust built will allow your organization to be more adaptable. Adaptability builds resilience and allows innovation and transformation.

This talk will mostly focus on my continual learnings as I’ve worked, and usually struggled, to build trust during this pandemic in an environment where I’ve never met most of my co-workers.

Registration Link is https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5744331842761271563

Leveraging some graphic resources

Let’s be honest – slides and presentations from quality professionals tend to be text heavy and graphic poor. I’m no expert here, but I have settled on a few subscriptions that help me produce fair to middling presentations and graphics.

  • SlideModel, SlideGeeks, SlideTeam – You probably don’t want all three (or one of the other competitors) but have a subscription to just one of these have saved my sanity more times than I can count.
  • NounProject – Oh how I love the icons this organization makes available. I use them everywhere! Presentations, procedures, technical systems. Great price structure, decent licensing. Now with a decent photo library too. Someday I will organize one of their Iconathons for developing a good set of icons around quality principles and tools.
  • Photolibrary – So many free and low priced ones out there. I don’t use photos nearly enough but I keep up a low level shutterstock subscription and use my monthly quota.

My goal this year is to use more graphics in my blog. Well actually my goal is to post more this year, 2020 was kind of a wash.