Implementing a Quality Ambassador Program

Quality ambassadors can influence their peers to prioritize quality, thereby strengthening the culture of quality in the organization. Quality leaders can use this guide to develop a quality ambassador program by identifying, training, and engaging ambassadors.

Utilizing Kotter’s eight accelerators for change, we can implement a Quality Ambassador program like this:

AcceleratorActions
Create a strong sense of urgency around a big opportunityDemonstrate the organizational value of Ambassadors by performing a needs analysis to assess the current state of employee engagement with quality.
Build and evolve a guiding coalitionBring together key stakeholders from across the organization who will provide input in the program’s design and support its implementation.
Form a change vision and strategic initiativesIdentify the key objectives for implementing a Quality Ambassador program and outline the lines of effort required to successfully design and pilot it.
Enlist a volunteer armyReach out and engage informal leaders at all levels of the organization. Find your current informal Ambassadors and draw them in.
Enable action by removing barriersBe vigilant for factors that impede progress. Work with your Ambassadors and senior leaders to give teams the freedom and support to succeed.
Generate and celebrate short-term winsPilot the program. Create success stories by looking at the successful outcomes of teams that have Quality Ambassadors and by listening to team members and their customers for evidence that quality culture is improving. Your goal will be to create an environment where teams that do not have Quality Ambassadors are asking how they can participate.
Sustain accelerationScale the impact of your program by implementing it more broadly within the organization.

Define the Key Responsibilities of Quality Ambassadors

  
What activities should Quality Ambassadors focus on?  Example: Reinforce key quality messages with co-workers. Drive participation in quality improvement projects. Provide inputs to improve culture of quality. Provide inputs to improve and maintain data integroty
What will Quality Ambassadors need from their managers?    Example: Approval to participate, must be renewed annually
What will Quality Ambassadors receive from the Quality team?    Example: Training on ways to improve employee engagement with quality. Support for any questions/objections that ariseTraining on data integrity  
What are Quality Ambassadors’ unique responsibilities?    Example: Acting as the point of contact for all quality-related queries. Reporting feedback from their teams to the Quality leadership. Conveying to employees the personal impact of quality on their effectiveness. Mitigating employee objections about pursuing quality improvement projects. Tackling obstacles to rolling out quality initiatives
What responsibilities do Quality Ambassadors share with other employees?    Example: Constantly prioritize quality in their day-to-day work  
Expected time commitment    Example: 8-10 hours/month, plus 6 hours of training at launch

Metrics to Measure Success

Type of MetricsList of MetricsDirect Impact of Ambassador’s workRecommendations
Active Participation LevelsPercentage of organizational units adopting culture of quality program.
The number of nominations for quality recognition programs. Quality observations were identified during Gemba walks. Participation or effectiveness of problem-solving or root-cause processes. The number of ongoing quality improvement projects. Percentage of employees receiving quality training  
HighAmbassadors should be directly held responsible for these metrics
Culture of Quality AssessmentsCulture of quality surveys. Culture of quality maturity assessmentsMediumThe Quality Ambassador program is a factor for improvement.
Overall Quality PerformanceKey KPI associated with Quality. Audit scoresCost of poor qualityLowThe Quality Ambassador program is a factor for improvement.

Building the Risk Team

Good risk assessments are a team effort. If done right this is a key way to reduce subjectivity and it recognizes that none of us know everything.

An effective risk team:

One of the core jobs of a process owner in risk assessment is assembling this team and ensuring they have the space to do their job. They are often called the champion or sponsor for good reason.

It is important to keep in mind that membership of this team will change, gaining and losing members and bringing on people for specific subsections, depending on the scale and scope of the risk assessment.

The more complex the scope and the more involved the assessment tool, the more important it is to have a facilitator to drive the process. This allows someone to focus on the process of the risk assessment, and the reduction of subjectivity.

Dealing with Emotional Ambivalence

Wordcloud for Ambivalence

Ambivalence, the A in VUCA, is a concept that quality professionals struggle with. We often call it “navigating the gray” or something similar. It is a skill we need to grow into, and definitely an area that should be central to your development program.

There is a great article in Harvard Business Review on “Embracing the Power of Ambivalence” that I strongly recommend folks read. This article focuses on emotional ambivalence, the feeling of being “torn” and discusses the return to the office. I’m not focusing on that topic (though like everyone I have strong opinions), instead I think the practices described there are great to think about as we develop a culture of quality.

ISPE’s cultural excellence model

Serendipitous Collaboration

As we discuss the future of work, of how we do in-person, remote and hybrid it is critical to think about how modern knowledge work is highly networked and collaborative and benefits from social serendipity through social networks and access to people with complementary expertise. Value is often created in an ecosystemic way and through social networks, and as we determine new ways of working it is important to consider how we will allow social serendipity while at the same time creating flexibility.

Frequent, informal, spontaneous interactions in collocated work environments enable cohesive relationships and increases social awareness. There are four major types of collaboration that stem from social serendipity:

Collaboration-asDefinitionExamples
Intellectual generositySharing ideas freely with others for the advancement of the organizationFree exchange of ideas
MentorshipWorking with less experienced colleagues to encourage and support developmentGiving feedback
CommunicationDisseminating knowledge and visionPresenting results
PerformativityWorking with others to solve problems and improve performanceProblem-solving teams

As we evaluate our organizations, build and sustain teams, we should be looking for ways to enhance the ability to have social serendipity, enshrining this as part of our team norms.

ASQ Storytime – A Team and Workplace Excellence Forum

Join the ASQ Team and Workplace Excellence Forum on Tuesday, June 15 at 7:00 p.m. Eastern, for ASQ Storytime, a fun story share where you are invited to share your stories as a quality professional. Stories may either be free-style or in PechaKucha style on the themes of “Driving out Fear” or “Quality Life After the Pandemic.”

Each story will be five minutes.

Register to speak here

Prizes (books) will be awarded for the best stories (voted by participants) in each style category, for funniest, education, and “Thing I will use tomorrow”

Register for the Event here