ASQ Team and Workplace Excellence Unconference

The Team and Workplace Excellence invites you to atted our Unconference on 29-Feb-2020 in Boston, MA.

An unconference is a wonderful way to address a problem by asking people who are passionate about the subject to drive the content, and by flexibly changing the day’s activities based on the interests of the people involved.

We are going to start with a back-of-the napkin exercise to start answering the question “What does Team Excellence look like.” This exercise is just what it sounds like, we will break into teams and write/draw an answer on the back of a napkin.

After this we will role up our sleeves and go from there. The unconference is an experiment, and we expect a small but committed crowd (right now we have about 15 people, if I get 30 I’ll be the happiest of organizers).

An unconference is a great process because everyone who cares about the challenge at hand (team excellence and quality culture) can accept the organizers’ invitation and is included with an equal opportunity to contribute. We are trying to make sure that our participants issues are raised and that there is a sense of responsibility for tacking the issues we care about. The “Law of Two Feet” governs the participation of all attendees in the various sessions: “Go and attend whichever session you want, but if you find yourself in a session where you are not learning or contributing, use your two feet!”

As an experiment, the unconference serves two purposes: 1. Try a slightly different way of working; and, 2. Drive the development of a body of knowledge for the Division and the ASQ.

We will start together in a large circle (or maybe two concentric circles depending on the space). The participants will suggest sessions and then away we go!

We will end the day by a call to action and an agreed upon plan. This will drive a lot of Team and Workplace Excellence activities for the next year.

If the experiment is a success, the Team and Workplace Excellence Forum has funds earmarked to hold 2 more this year. Ideally, I’d like to do at least one in a different region of the country.

The Unconference is free to all ASQ members. There will be a charge for non-ASQ members’ of $15.00 for lunch. This counts as professional development for those with ASQ certifications.

See the my.ASQ event page for details and register here.

Unconference for ASQ Team and Workplace Excellence

The Team and Workplace Excellence Forum is excited to be hosting an Unconference, and I am excited to be able to invite you to the workshop at Masary Studios in Boston, MA on February 29th from 9:00 am to 2:30 pm.

An unconference is basically a conference without predefined topics. The high level structure and theme is team excellence and quality culture, but actual topics are generated by the participants on the spot, and breakout groups are formed dynamically based on interest and relevance.

We have a stimulating day planned. We will be discussing team excellence and quality culture and contributing to development of a body of knowledge for the Team and Workplace Excellence Forum. The agenda is here.

The Unconference is free to members of the ASQ. For non-ASQ members there is a charge of $15.00 per person for lunch.

Please RSVP by February 23rd, so we can reserve a seat for you. We are looking forward to seeing you there. If there is anything you will need or have any questions, please don’t hesitate to let me know. The RSVP is here.

The my.ASQ.org event page is here: https://my.asq.org/communities/events/item/170/60/1568

ASQ TWEF UnConference

I’m organizing a mini UnConference for the ASQ Team and Workplace Excellence Forum.

A survey for logistics and attendance is here.

An UnConference, otherwise known as a OpenSpace or BarCamp, is a tool I’m a huge fan of. They can really serve to generate action and build energy, commitment, and shared leadership with a group by unleashing self-organization. The idea is to make sure that ALL of the issues that are most important to the participants are raised, included in the agenda, and addressed, making it possible for participants to take responsibility for tackling the issues that they care about and for what does or doesn’t happen

Which makes it a great tool for the Team and Workplace Excellence Forum to really generate some activity. If you are interested please respond to the survey above.

Teaching Quality People to Listen

Been thinking a lot on what a training program around teaching people to listen and not to talk might look like and how it fits into a development program for quality professionals.

People in quality think a lot on how to make a reasoned argument, a good decision, to provide guidance, get their point across in meetings, persuade or coerce people to follow standards. This is understandable, but it has a cost. There is a fair amount of research out there that indicates that all too often when others are talking, we are getting ready to speak instead of listening.

I think we fail to listen because we are anxious about our own performance, concerned about being viewed as an expert, convinced that our ideas are better than others, comfortable in our expertise, or probably all of the above. As a result we get into conflicts that could be avoided, miss opportunities to advance the conversation, alienate people and diminish our teams’ effectiveness.

When we really listen we create the spaces to make quality decisions. Listening can be improved by these practices:

Ask expansive questions. Stay curious, build on other’s ideas are mantras I think most of us are familiar with. Suppress the urge to interrupt or dominate a conversation and concentrate on the implications of other people’s words. It is very easy for a quality professional to instantly leap to solving the problem, and we need to be able to give space. Focus on open-ended “what” and “how” questions, which encourage people to provide more information, reflect on the situation and feel more heard. Avoid yes-and-no questions which can kill dialogue.

Engage in “self-checks”. Be aware of one’s own tendencies and prepare with ways to identify they are happening and head them off. Doing this will surprisingly allow you to focus on the listener and not yourself moving beyond the words that are being said and being able to take in the speaker’s tone, body language, emotions and perspective, and the energy in the conversation.

Become comfortable with silence. This means communicating attentiveness and respect while you are silent.

Listening needs to be part of our core competencies, and unless we work on it, we don’t get better.