Here, There, Everywhere

I’m doing a Gamestorming Expeditions right now, and it is a lot of fun. I’ve been a fan of gamestorming techniques for years, and it is great to be able to do this program with a bunch of other facilitators and have a space to learn. One of the best virtual events I’ve done during the pandemic and I highly recommend it.

One of the great games we’ve learned is a wrap-up, “Here, There and everywhere”

Here something in our time together that caught your attention, piqued your curiosity or, at the very least, you noticed. It might be a game, a comment from a fellow participant, a concept, a visual framework, etc… 

There how you might take that specific example and implement it at work or in your personal life. Bring in as much detail as you can to make for easy implementation; imagine your future self doing it and the outcome it generates

Everywhere would be a generalized interpretation of this thing that would allow for more universal application – an underlying principle absent context 

I love it for the elegance and simplicity and have already used it in my own practice.

Brainstorming and Conflict

Like most facilitators I have strong opinions on brainstorming. And like a lot of the soft side of quality, these facilitation skills can really open themselves to a criticism of the vulnerability of scientific claims and there is a fair amount of justification for criticisms of the pursuit of novelty over truth. Add to it that there is this major pipeline of junk psychological science and there are good reasons for challenging these opinions.

It is for this reason I do less and less brainstorming as a verbal exercise, and rely more on brainwriting as I discussed in the post “Brainstorming usually sinks your ship.”

In the article “Should we allow criticism while brainstorming?” by Dylan Walsh we are exposed to some research from Jared Curhan at MIT that shows when criticism should be leveraged in brainstorming exercises. Well worth the read.

Surviving the Horror of Online Meetings (Book Review)

Surviving the Horror of Online Meetings

Written by Brian Tarallo

Illustrated by Mark Monlux

A fun read this week has been Surviving the Horror of Online Meetings, which brings a great deal of fun to a very pertinent topic in a pretty short page count (70 pages). As a fan of classic monster movies I can’t recommend the art enough.

Tons of good survival tips. Some of my favorite were:

  • Plan five minute sprints – for every 5 minutes of slide presentations or briefings include something that will engage participants – for example a poll or a breakout session.
  • “I Like, I wish, what if” – participants type feedback into chat about idea share
  • Hide self-view – I instantly did this and it makes such a difference

And then each of the silver bullets was worth the price of admission.

We are all fatigued from constant online meetings, and they are not going anywhere. This book is a fun bit of medicine and I definitely recommend giving it a read.