Top 5 Posts by Views in 2019 (first half)

With June almost over a look at the five top views for 2019. Not all of these were written in 2019, but I find it interesting what folks keep ending up at my blog to read.

  1. FDA signals – no such thing as a planned deviation: Since I wrote this has been a constant source of hits, mostly driven by search engines. I always feel like I should do a follow-up, but not sure what to say beyond – don’t do planned deviations, temporary changes belong in the change control system.
  2. Empathy and Feedback as part of Quality Culture: The continued popularity of this post since I wrote it in March has driven a lot of the things I am writing lately.
  3. Effective Change Management: Change management and change control are part of my core skill set and I’m gratified that this post gets a lot of hits. I wonder if I should build it into some sort of expanded master class, but I keep feeling I already have.
  4. Review of Audit Trails: Data Integrity is so critical these days. I should write more on the subject.
  5. Risk Management is about reducing uncertainty: This post really captures a lot of the stuff I am thinking about and driving action on at work.

Thinking back to my SWOT, and the ACORN test I did at the end of 2018, I feel fairly good about the first six months. I certainly wish I found time to blog more often, but that seems doable. And like most bloggers, I still am looking for ways to increase engagement with my posts and to spark conversations.

FDA signals – no such thing as a planned deviation

The subject of planned deviations made for a raucous “Breakfast with the FDA” session Sept. 25 at the Parenteral Drug Association/FDA conference in Washington.

These are the deviations from standard operating procedures that workers carry out on purpose, typically to keep a pharmaceutical plant operating when for one reason or another they won’t be doing it the way the company said they would.

FDA Compliance Experts Advise Against Treating Minor Changes As ‘Planned Deviations’” – Bowman Cox, Pink Sheet

I wish I had gone to the PDA/FDA conference this year, if for nothing else to have been able to stand up and cheer wildly when this was said:

Brooke Higgins, a senior policy advisor in the FDA drug center’s Office of Compliance, agreed that “it’s a very strange term, and it kind of makes your skin crawl a little bit.”

There is a whole lot more good stuff over at the Pink Sheet’s summary.

I am a firm believer that there are no such things as planned changes. There are change controls, some of which are temporary, occasionally even ones that are retroactive (deviation identifies a change which is formalized in a change control). But all are through the same system, with the same evaluations and assessments and the same sorts of actions.

Keep all changes together. Its a true best practice.